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Posts tagged Always

1,243 notes

erindizmo:

optimisticstorm:

beaubete:

isthisrubble:

AO3 does not fuck around, people
This email is about the fic I posted at 9 o’clock last night, I woke up to it this morning
Further proof that AO3 cares about its readers and aren’t slow about telling its writers to toe the line
fanfiction.net would just delete the fic, wouldn’t they?

I kind of really don’t like this? I mean, how did you have it tagged before? Did you maybe just forget to tag it with Major Character Death?I’ve got a fic up in which James Bond is dead. Completely dead, blunt force trauma to the head and abandoned in the tube. He’s revived by Q when Q finds him because Q is a faerie living in the tunnels and he knows it will be more trouble than it’s worth to let Bond’s rotting corpse stink up the place, but when Bond comes to, he has distinct memories of things that should have led to death and wanders around wearing clothing streaked with his own gore.Now, granted, it’s a little bit vague that this is what’s happened—we find out that Bond has been killed only after he’s already been brought back, and Q is deliberately opaque about what happened, but still. In that fic, Bond’s death doesn’t deserve a warning, even though it happens. It’s not even a “choose not to warn” situation because his death is such a non-existent blip in the story that it almost isn’t important. Warning for death would put people off—it always does—and “choose not to warn” is typically as bad as actually warning for death. I can see if the death is a major part of the story and/or detailed/triggery there may be a need for a tag, but if not, I’m bothered by AO3 policing your work to the extent that they tell you they’re going to go into the settings and make changes to your work. I understand wanting to protect readers, but it’s inappropriate to threaten to make changes against your will that may affect how your work is perceived.

I feel like tags are starting to get a bit extreme. Not all the time, but sometimes. For example, I get annoyed with certain ones (especially the Major Character Death tag) because they give away what happens in the story. 
I feel like Trigger Warnings are growing to be too much. Books and TV don’t give trigger warnings, and no one makes a fuss about that - why is it such a big deal in fan fiction?

Well, like they say in the original e-mail, that’s what ‘Author Chose Not To Use Archive Warnings’ is for. If you don’t want to warn, you’re not by any means required to. But if you tag it ‘No Archive Warnings Apply’, then you’re spoiling (in a way) by outright stating that in that particular work there is no major character death, non-con, graphic violence, or underage sex. So if someone goes into one that is tagged with that, they are well within their rights to be upset and report the work (because it does violate the TOS which you agree to by posting).
A lot of Choose Not To Warn works don’t have any of the above either, but the creators just don’t want to disclose. And that’s cool. I personally use CNTW when in my opinion it’s borderline in my work as to whether the warning tag should be added or not.
And if someone really does not want to be spoiled for the content of the archive warnings, they can always set their preferences so the warning tags don’t show up! Everyone wins!

The “Trigger Warnings are growing to be too much” thing is something I’m seeing a lot of lately, and I don’t think you could be more wrong.
TV and movies DO have trigger warnings.  They’re the ratings, which are now fairly detailed.  Avengers, for example, carried a notation that it contained a ‘passing drug reference,’ for Tony’s ‘big bag of weed’ line.  That detailed.  I mean, that’s kind of detailed.  I saw it in the ratings info and laughed.
But here’s the thing.  The archive warnings are there to protect the readers.  While I’m sure that for the previous author, having a character bludgeoned to death wasn’t a big deal, it’s fine, he got better.
For readers, though, a sudden, violent attack that leads to a death, no matter how short a time he may be dead, is unexpected and possibly not something that reader is capable of dealing with at that moment.  For someone who has lost a friend or family member to violence of that nature, or who has THEMSELVES experienced that sort of traumatic attack, being blindsided by it when they are not expecting it can be absolutely horrible.  
So when the writer chooses not to put major trigger warnings on their works, they are putting the ‘surprise’ or ‘shock’ of their plot above the well-being of the reader.  If you think that warning for triggers will put people off of your fic?  It might.  But you know what really, really puts people off of your fic?  The feeling of betrayal that results in when someone thinks they have entered a safe space and find out that it is not.
Trigger Warnings are not an attempt at censorship.  It is not an attempt to make writers compromise their artistic integrity.  It is a way to provide information, so that readers can make an educated decision about what they, at that moment, are capable of handling.  For all the readers who don’t need them, I am so glad.
But I will tag, down to the smallest thing, for the one reader out of ten thousand who needs that tag desperately.  This is not about me, or my work.  It’s about making sure that I share it in a responsible manner, and as a writer and a reader, I’m very grateful for AO3 and its volunteer staff of moderators and tag wranglers.
For making sure we are all responsible.  This is our hobby.  This is our happy place.  I think that right to a safe space within fandom should be extended to every reader.

erindizmo:

optimisticstorm:

beaubete:

isthisrubble:

AO3 does not fuck around, people

This email is about the fic I posted at 9 o’clock last night, I woke up to it this morning

Further proof that AO3 cares about its readers and aren’t slow about telling its writers to toe the line

fanfiction.net would just delete the fic, wouldn’t they?

I kind of really don’t like this? I mean, how did you have it tagged before? Did you maybe just forget to tag it with Major Character Death?

I’ve got a fic up in which James Bond is dead. Completely dead, blunt force trauma to the head and abandoned in the tube. He’s revived by Q when Q finds him because Q is a faerie living in the tunnels and he knows it will be more trouble than it’s worth to let Bond’s rotting corpse stink up the place, but when Bond comes to, he has distinct memories of things that should have led to death and wanders around wearing clothing streaked with his own gore.

Now, granted, it’s a little bit vague that this is what’s happened—we find out that Bond has been killed only after he’s already been brought back, and Q is deliberately opaque about what happened, but still. In that fic, Bond’s death doesn’t deserve a warning, even though it happens. It’s not even a “choose not to warn” situation because his death is such a non-existent blip in the story that it almost isn’t important. Warning for death would put people off—it always does—and “choose not to warn” is typically as bad as actually warning for death. I can see if the death is a major part of the story and/or detailed/triggery there may be a need for a tag, but if not, I’m bothered by AO3 policing your work to the extent that they tell you they’re going to go into the settings and make changes to your work. I understand wanting to protect readers, but it’s inappropriate to threaten to make changes against your will that may affect how your work is perceived.

I feel like tags are starting to get a bit extreme. Not all the time, but sometimes. For example, I get annoyed with certain ones (especially the Major Character Death tag) because they give away what happens in the story. 

I feel like Trigger Warnings are growing to be too much. Books and TV don’t give trigger warnings, and no one makes a fuss about that - why is it such a big deal in fan fiction?

Well, like they say in the original e-mail, that’s what ‘Author Chose Not To Use Archive Warnings’ is for. If you don’t want to warn, you’re not by any means required to. But if you tag it ‘No Archive Warnings Apply’, then you’re spoiling (in a way) by outright stating that in that particular work there is no major character death, non-con, graphic violence, or underage sex. So if someone goes into one that is tagged with that, they are well within their rights to be upset and report the work (because it does violate the TOS which you agree to by posting).

A lot of Choose Not To Warn works don’t have any of the above either, but the creators just don’t want to disclose. And that’s cool. I personally use CNTW when in my opinion it’s borderline in my work as to whether the warning tag should be added or not.

And if someone really does not want to be spoiled for the content of the archive warnings, they can always set their preferences so the warning tags don’t show up! Everyone wins!

The “Trigger Warnings are growing to be too much” thing is something I’m seeing a lot of lately, and I don’t think you could be more wrong.

TV and movies DO have trigger warnings.  They’re the ratings, which are now fairly detailed.  Avengers, for example, carried a notation that it contained a ‘passing drug reference,’ for Tony’s ‘big bag of weed’ line.  That detailed.  I mean, that’s kind of detailed.  I saw it in the ratings info and laughed.

But here’s the thing.  The archive warnings are there to protect the readers.  While I’m sure that for the previous author, having a character bludgeoned to death wasn’t a big deal, it’s fine, he got better.

For readers, though, a sudden, violent attack that leads to a death, no matter how short a time he may be dead, is unexpected and possibly not something that reader is capable of dealing with at that moment.  For someone who has lost a friend or family member to violence of that nature, or who has THEMSELVES experienced that sort of traumatic attack, being blindsided by it when they are not expecting it can be absolutely horrible.  

So when the writer chooses not to put major trigger warnings on their works, they are putting the ‘surprise’ or ‘shock’ of their plot above the well-being of the reader.  If you think that warning for triggers will put people off of your fic?  It might.  But you know what really, really puts people off of your fic?  The feeling of betrayal that results in when someone thinks they have entered a safe space and find out that it is not.

Trigger Warnings are not an attempt at censorship.  It is not an attempt to make writers compromise their artistic integrity.  It is a way to provide information, so that readers can make an educated decision about what they, at that moment, are capable of handling.  For all the readers who don’t need them, I am so glad.

But I will tag, down to the smallest thing, for the one reader out of ten thousand who needs that tag desperately.  This is not about me, or my work.  It’s about making sure that I share it in a responsible manner, and as a writer and a reader, I’m very grateful for AO3 and its volunteer staff of moderators and tag wranglers.

For making sure we are all responsible.  This is our hobby.  This is our happy place.  I think that right to a safe space within fandom should be extended to every reader.

Filed under surprise deathfic is always wrong always and you will never convince me otherwise and I will never read a second piece by a writer who pulls that ao3 is my happy place Time to make a donation!

195 notes

Fic: Working Both Sides of the Sheets, pt 1

((It’s Kara’s fault.  Just saying.  ANYWAY.  Have some Clint/Phil fic.  It does not take place in any of my established verses, and you’ll see why soon enough.  Content warning for discussion of prostitution and the sex trade.  All sex depicted within the fic will be consensual, but there will be mention of SHIELD’s attempts at breaking up a sex ring involving teenagers.))

After nine straight days of sitting at this table, Phil Coulson had reached a conclusion about his life: he hated this bar.

Life had taken on a familiar, boring pattern. He walked in, he told the bartender he was looking for ‘work,’ he ordered a drink, and he took a seat in the back of the shadowed bar. Then he sat there. For hours. Watching the coming and going of every person who passed through the small, high end bar. There was a steady, unending flow of people, mostly men, who came and went from dusk until the bar closed.

Phil sat, and waited. Hour. After hour. After hour.

Read more …

Filed under fic SHIELD husbands Phil and Clint may have had some miscommunications Always KARAKARAKARA!

117,161 notes

Donald Glover talking about the comments he received during his campaign to be the next Spider-Man (x)

“I was talking about it with Dan Eckman, who directed my Bonfire video. Can you imagine that trailer? That would be dope. Like it makes sense… a poor black kid in Queens. Like it just fits.”

(Source: halemcjoel, via dr-kara)

Filed under BUT HE'D BE SUCH A CUTE PETER look at that face! This nonsense is unacceptable ALWAYS And I can't believe we have to fight it every goddamn time